Friday, September 21, 2007

Macbeth Act 3 questions

89 comments:

ZachH said...

I thought it was odd Banquo really didn't specify where he was going. He just said he was going out with Fleance. Did anyone pick up on where he was going? Does anyone elese think it was wierd?

elisabethc said...

We talked about this in class Zach, if you were listening. Mrs. Smith was talking about how Macbeth is asking Banquo all of those questions because even he does not know where they are going. He wants to make sure that they are there that night because Lady Macbeth and him have the whole second murder planned out. We don't know where he is going either but maybe we will find out later in the book. All Banquo said was that it was a far ride but that they would return for the feast.

morganw said...

Zachh, I thought it was odd as well that Banquo didn't tell Macbeth where he was going. I think he did this though because he was suspicious of Macbeth and knew that he waould be next on the list for murder. I have a feeling that he might be taking Fleance with him to hide him from Macbeth so that Macbeth cannot kill banquo and his son. It's a pitty that Macbeth is destroying the best friendship he ever had in order to fufill a prophecy.

amandah said...

zachh I agree with you it was really odd that Banquo didn't specify where he was going. I think maybe its because Banquo suspects Macbeth so he's just being cautious and protecting himself.

hannahl said...

I think that the very reason why it is weird to the readers is because it seems weird to Macbeth. This doesn't actually make it weird though. He's leaving, so what? I don't want that to sound rude to anyone at all but I personally beleive that it is only weird because Macbeth thinks that Banquo is suspicious and plotting to overthrow him which is so wrong. Banquo just wanted to get away from all the chaos is my guess. I mean the king just died, that probably doesn't feel so good. I feel so sorry for Banquo because he is such a nice guy but his best freind is trying to kill him.

stefo said...

Banquo was very evasive about where he was going and why. it could be because he was nervous about telling macbeth anything personal or Banquo is acting on his worries over Macbeth and foul play.

chelseas said...

zachh, I agree with what elizabethc said. We did discuss this in class. Since they have the second murder to plan out, Macbeth wants to make sure and know where everyone is. I also agree with hannahl when she said that she feels sorry for Banquo because he is about to be murdered, by his so called friend. I don’t have any other questions yet.

melissaz said...

Hannahl, I totally agree with you. The audience is left feeling suspitious just because Macbeth is now feeling jumpy and too curious. I don't think that Banquo is going to hide and protect him and his son because I don't think Banquo knows that Macbeth did kil Macbeth. I don't think where they go and how spesific they are really is something to make the reader suspious.

I'm just curious, why does Macbeth all of a sudden feel the need for Banquo to be killed. There would be nothing in my world that would cause me to even think about having my best friend killed and now out of the blue, Macbeth decides that he is cramping his style and needs a dead best friend. I know he is now getting nervouse but there must be some really big reason to cause him to want him dead. I don't know, it just seems odd to me.

alexd said...

To go along with the quote in the other blog, "It will have blood they say. Blood will have blood...� I think that Macbeth is digging himself in an even bigger whole in this situation. At first when he had just killed Duncan I though that he was going to get away with it but now I am questioning his sanity and his reasoning. Is he almost as crazy as Lady Macbeth?

clarao said...

I still don't know why the weird sisters did this to Macbeth. What do they have to gain from his suffering? Are they just entertained by Macbeth's uncertainty about everything he does? It sounded like they did it on purpose because it looked like they were casting a spell in Act One.

markg said...

I think its interesting how when they kill banquo they dont make big deal of it. Also when banqou is getting killed he says "though mayst revenge" he is talking about fleance avenging Macbeth...

aaronw said...

Well, I have a couple questions:
They talk about that "stones have been known to move and trees to speak". What? Since when? Also, whats a Hyrcan tiger? And how come it only rhymes sometimes??? I don't get it...

mattf said...

Does anyone else think that Fleance will kill Macbeth in the end?

hannahl said...

What exactly forced Macbeth to want to kill Banquo because it seems unclear to me?

morgant said...

Well, to answer anybody who is wondering why Macbeth keeps referring to serpent imagery, I think that it is because the serpent is an image of the devil. If you guys remember, in the Bible, Adam and Eve are tempted by the devil in the form of a serpent. That is why I think Macbeth is referring to serpent imagery a lot.

ParkerH said...

Hannah, Macbeth can't let Banquo live, since he knows about the prophecy. If Banquo thinks a little, he might have a suspicion that Macbeth killed Duncan.

morgant said...

mattf- That is an interesting idea of an outcome for Macbeth. Since, he escaped from the killing scene, it is very possible that may happen. This will be interesting to figure out how Macbeth will cause his own downfall.

lesliel said...

im confused about who fleance is though... so i havnt made the connection to who is going to kill macbeth in the end.

lesliel said...

oh wait nevermind, looked in the cast and found out that fleance is his son.. ok yeah i can totally see fleance killing macbeth

mattf said...

Lesliel-fleance is Banquo's son

hannahl said...

What does the serpent represent? Is it like the beast in LOF, or a symbol of the fear of the unknown corners of human nature?

morgant said...

hannahl-the serpent could represent fear, but it could also represent the evil in Macbeth's deeds. The evil will never go away no matter what Macbeth tries to do. Does that help a little bit?

hannahl said...

Why do you think the ghost makes Macbeth less than a man?

KekeK said...

SNAKE!!!

Snake like betrayal and temptation!
Like how Macbeth is tempted by the thought of being king and betrays the king AND his bff Banquo!

Woah!

Does anyone support this theory?<- I think you should because it is a very good theory and also isn't very good because it's so obvious. One might just think that it's a statement with an obvious question at the end.

maddisonm said...

I think the serpent represents the devil. Serpent refers to a snake and a snake in Christianity refers to the devil.

morgant said...

hannahl- Banquo's ghost makes Macbeth less of a man because he killed Banquo. He didn't actually commit it, but he had others do it for him. Real men don't murder. When he sees the ghost, Macbeth can't claim that he is a man. I hope I'm explaining this okay. This may be just one theory.

lesliel said...

what was the whole witch thing about? i mean i know it was supposed to give macB more confidence or what ever but i dint really understnad anay of that?

KekeK said...

In addition to what Parker said to Hannah L about why Banquo needs to be dead, like Ms. Smith said, is that he can still produce more kids if he's still alive.

beckyg said...

Well with the serpeant thing, the serpeant has always been a sort of sin of temptation, betrayal, and the devil. When Lady Macbeth him to be a serpeant, she wants him to be all of these things.

I agree with Lesliel, the whole witch scene didn't make any scence.

Responding to what hannahl said, I think the ghost makes Macbeth less of a man because at most times, it is more cowardly (less manly) to do bad things and cover them with more bad things and lies than to tell the truth, confess your wrongness, and accept the consequences. Banquoes ghost is a constant reminder of this, so when it is around, Macbeth can't pretend that he is a real man. I hope I explained this okay for you.

amyw said...

lesliel---The witch thing took place because Hecate (the queen, or goddess of the witches) became angry at the three witches (who she sort of rules over) after hearing about the prophecy they told Macbeth about. She was angry because after hearing the prophecy, Macbeth became concerned only with himself and what he wanted, and she doesn't like it when people are selfish like this, and she especially didn't like it when she found out that the three witches' prophecy had made him become this way. So she told them about her plan to cast a spell on Macbeth to make him overconfident, which will lead to his downfall (remember when we talked about tragic heroes, we said that they all get one quality that leads to their downfall?).
Hope all of this makes sense!

Liap said...

I am suprised that Banquo was killed so easily, and that it was just brushed off. Also, I thought the whole scene with the witches was unneccecary.

amyw said...

As for the serpent, I think it symbolizes evil and the devil. Macbeth calls Fleance a serpent after he learns that the murderers only were able to kill Banquo and not Fleance because he believes that Fleance will threaten his claim to the throne. This is a silly fear because Fleance is just a boy and wouldn't be able to be king yet anyway, and besides that Macbeth is already king! This fear shows how paranoid he has gotten. And I think it's really ironic how he's going around calling everyone else serpents when the real serpent here is him.

amyw said...

liap---I thought the witch scene was unnecessary too, and in class Ms. Smith said how it's been thought that people just liked the witches so much that another writer went back and added that scene later just for entertainment, so Shakespeare didn't originally include that scene in the play. It has no reason other than entertainment and further explaining the downfall that will come to Macbeth.

katyj said...

hannah - Banquo's ghost appearing to Macbeth makes him less than a man because to kill where it is not warranted is an evil thing that takes part of your soul every time it happens, even indirectly, which, makes him more animal like, for example a snake; which you can totally reference to Harry Potter, because Voldemort kills a lot of people who don't deserve to die, and it makes him more snake like, so that at the end he even looks like a snake. AMAZING!
lia - Ms. smith said that many peolpe think that scene was added later, probably becuase it is completely pointless, and has absolutly no value to the overall story. So i think you are totally right, the witches scene is totally pointless.

Ryad said...

Katyj that is so true about Voldemort in Harry Potter that is so awsome. I didn't even think of that. And yeah I really didn't see the point of the witches scene either. It makes sense to say that it was added later.

maddief said...

Noooo,why did Banquo have to die?! He was one of the only nice characters in the play, let alone sane. I just can't believe that Macbeth would kill his supposedly best friend, just for power. Also, anyone know where Fleance is hiding?

alexf said...

Ok, so far I have gotten mostly everything (Ha, I no, I'm proud!) But now i'm just wondering, who is starting to support macbeth? Were they his enemys? Ms. Smith talked about it at the end of class (5th) but i didn't quite catch it... thanks!

mattw said...

ya i din't get that either, but I think that it means he'll be like, exiled from the kingdom or something, so he'll team up with his old kingdom's enemies. I really don't no tho. I think I get it too, but I think it would have been painfully obvious that Macbeth had gone crazy when he started talking to an empty chair at a feast.

morgant said...

maddief- I totally agree! I really like Banquo! I hated that he had to die. I have no idea where Fleance is hiding.

maddisonm said...

alexf- I was wondering the same thing. I myself was a little unsure what Ms. Smith was saying about his enemys towards the end of English block 5. Could anyone clarify?

morganw said...

Maddief and Morgant - Fleance is hiding in England with Malcolm. Those two have joined up with Macduff (who is now on the verge of being exiled) and are planning a war to overthrow Macbeth. I hope that helps with any queestions.

morganw said...

Maddisonm - His enemies are the countries and groups such as Northumberland and England who he fought against in the beginning of the book. Malcolm, Fleance, and Macduff are helping organize the enemies of Macbeth for a throw-over.

maddisonm said...

Does anyone else find it interesting that Duncan's sons live and Banquo's son lives?!?

lesliel said...

Thanks Amy! So another question about the witches: Does this mean that Hecate is more of a good witch if she wants Macbeth to have it simpler? Or does she just want the way things are going to be going the way she wants it? Like what kind of witch or person is she?

ryanm said...

lesliel i think hecate wants macbeth to have it easy because the weird sisters defied her authority and caused hell for macbeth without her consent.

morgant said...

morganw-Thanks! That does clarify my questions! =D

morganw said...

I agree with Ryanm - I think Hecate is really just upset becuase she wants things to be the way she wants them to be - not how anyone else wants them to be.

Maddisonm - I do find it very interesting that the sons live! I think this means that they will be the saving grace of Scottland and remove Macbeth from power.

kristinah said...

Here I go, I am just going to list all of my comments under every act if that is ok.

Scene one:
-Did banquo ever tell macbeth that he thought that he had done something bad to get the throne because banquo says "and I fear
Thou played'st most foully for 't" but that was before macbeth entered I thought?

- A lot of the time people are refered to as bloody. Does this mean bloody like really blood or symbolic for sin or bloody like the old english bloody like annoying or bad?

- It was really annoying when macbeth kept asking banquo about where he was going and for how long and why and all of that stuff. It must have made Banquo suspicious of Macbeth, like he was planning something. I kind of don't understand why he is so concerned about this???

-Macbeth seems to grow very jealous of Banquo in this scene, he says that his crown is fruitless because he will not be able to pass his crown onto his children. I think that he should be happy with what he had got, he always wants more, more, more!!!

-Macbeth doesn't think through things very much because he is now about to repeat the exact same mistake of taking control of his own fate instead of just letting things happen the natural way. He should know that the prophesy will come true anyways.

- How did Banquo make the lives of the murderers unhappy and bad??

-Lady Macbeth rubbed off on macbeth a little and he is now using some of her tactics of persuasion.

Scene 2
- What is the relationship change between macbeth and lady macbeth? I think that their relationship is more comfortable now and not so intense. Macbeth now has a pet name for his lady and she is now reasureing him that everything will be ok. But I am still not sure.

- On the serpent imagery I think that macbeth uses this to relate things to evil. Because in the Bible the cause of Adam and eves downfall was the serpent, representing the devil and evil.Also it could relate to things that are dangerous to macbeth because in scene 4 he refers to banquo as a serpent and his son (who is still living) as a serpent who does not yet have fangs.

Scene 3
- On the third murderer, I think that it is just another person that Macbeth hired to be sure that the job was done because he wanted to have the odds 3 against 2 in his favor, it could be macbeth since he doesn't enter the dining scene till later and he is so disturbed by the returning ghost of banquo but if he was there than he would have known that fleance escaped and he wouldnt have had the same reaction that he did.

Scene 4
-In this scene it is like he cannot believe that banquo truely was "taken care of." He repeatedly asks the murderer, "is banquo safe, banquo's been taken care of" it is like he just cannot believe it.

- Being a man and fear are often associated. If you fear than you are not a man!

-I don't think that it is a good idea for him to go see the witches again because all they seem to do for him is create chaos and trouble. What will they be telling him now??

- I think that one of Macbeth's downfalls is that he does not think before he acts. Also another cause of his downfall is overconfidence.

Scene 5
- Hecate forshadows that MAcbeth will come to know his destiny that may be a fatal end.

- Hecate says "security is mortals' chiefest enemy" which translates into overconfidence is man's greatest enemy which is one of Macbeth's downfalls.

Scene 6
-Lennox says that fleance could have killed duncan because he fled the scene but he would have had no reason to do this, he would have no gain.

-Why is Macbeth angery at Macduff and why is he starting a war. What did macduff do??

That is all, thank you!!

chelseas said...

Maddisonm, I thought the same exact thing. The odd thing was that they all fled the country, and it appeared that they killed their fathers. It really makes people on the outside wonder; did they really kill their fathers for the throne, and then flee because they thought that they would be framed for the murder? This poses an interesting point!

elisabethc said...

I have to agree with everyone that said that they though Fleance would kill Macbeth in the end. After all, Fleance is the one that is destined to become the king. Otherwise, Macbeth will just become over corrupt, do something really stupid and obvious that will completely uncover him. I can definately see how he is a tragic hero, and it is really tragic. Also, Macduff could be the person the uncovers Macbeth because he is nearly the opposite of Macbeth. I wonder how that will play out later and so far I am looking forward to when Macbeth is finished off. He is starting to drive me crazy.

maddisonm said...

morganw- thank you for that clarification!
Also chelseas- you are right that this poses an interesting point! It will be interesting to find out how everything comes around!

alyssas said...

Elizabeth C.- I actually don't think Fleance would kill Macbeth in the end unless Banquo told him about the witches' prophecy because otherwise, he would have no idea that he was destined to be king. I can also see how Macbeth has turned into a tragic hero compared to the beginning of the play where he had it all together and now he can't seem to tell what's reality and what isn't. (Like when he hallucinates at the banquet.) It's kinda sad...

kristinah said...

That is a good point alyssas, fleance doesn't even know that he is destined to become king so why would he kill macbeth. Unless someone ends up telling him that macbeth was in on the murder of his father and then he tries to kill macbeth for revenge, maybe the unknown third murderer.

maddief said...

Kristen, I agree, I don't think that Fleance would attack Macbeth out of personal interest, he's joining forces against Macbeth because everybody else is doing it anymore; it's the new fad! Unless Fleance becomes aware of the prophecy, the chances of him seeking revenge are pretty slim. (I hope that he becomes king though since his dad was my favorite character and now he's gone. *sob*)

amyw said...

lesliel---I think Hecate is a good witch because she wants Macbeth to get what he deserves, because he can't go around killing people forever. In a way his downfall might be good because than good will prevail, and since he has become evil, evil (him) will be banished. This is just my opinion though; it could also be though that she is bad for the very same reasons.

morganw said...

I think the only reason that Fleance would kill Macbeth would be because he would find out that Macbeth had had his father killed. Other than that he seems relativly unconnected to Macbeth.

Laurenc said...

Ms. Smith mentioned the scene with Hectate was added by someone else and not intended to be in the play by Shakespeare. I was wondering if anyone knew who came up with this scene and whether it was approved by Shakespeare or not.

sorry if this was already asked..

morganw said...

I find it hard to see Hectate or any witch as a good character just because of how Shakespeare has presented them so far through this play.

morganw said...

LaurenC - I don't think anybosy really knows who added the scene witht he witches or when they did. Most believe that Shakespeare did not originally have that scene though.

Laurenc said...

I also want to ask everyone's thoughts about all the evil characters being woman...well aside from Macbeth. If you think about it though, Macbeth probably would have never murdered Duncan and Banquo if it hadn't been for the women (witches and Lady Macbeth)

morgant said...

morganw- I agree. I can't see Hecate being a good character. I mean, she is the queen of the witches...

morganw said...

LaurenC - that is an interesting point. I hadn't really thought about that. I think this is because in Shakespeare's time women were not well though of and Shakespeare's trying to make a point through his plays that women can be intelligent and decieving as well as men.

hannahl said...

How did Macbeth make the murderer's do the deed? Was it just him saying that they were not men or was it his power as King or something else?

morgant said...

laurenc- That is an interesting observation. The bad people, with the exception of Macbeth, are women. That is wierd now that I think about it. I think maybe Shakespeare wanted to kind of say that some people are very easily influenced. Because, if you think about it, Macbeth lived in the era when the husbands 'ruled' over the wives. Macbeth could have said no, but he is easily influenced even if it is by women. This, again, may just be one theory.

ParkerH said...

That is a really good point Laurenc. But, the Thane of Cawdor was a traitor and was bad. So not every single bad person is a woman, but that does seem pretty sensible.

lesliel said...

HEY!! Blood will cause more blood : the blood (or murder) of Duncan lead to the blood (") of Banquo which will lead to Fleance or Malcom or Donalbain reacting to that blood and killing Macbeth? hmm.

hannahl said...

He realizes that blood has blood and yet he doesn't stop killing. Why is he so inclined to stay on his path of carnage?

Laurenc said...

Hannah, I think that Macbeth was able to convince the murderers to kill Banquo and Fleance by filling their minds with the idea that their situation (being poor) was caused by Banquo. I think the murderers probably knew this wasn't true but they probably wanted someone to take the blame and wanted someone to suffer while knowing they themselves wouldn't be punished for it

morganw said...

Hannah - I think it was a combination of those two as well as the murderers' ease of which they'll kill anybody. They don't really need many reasons to kill someone. Or at least that's how I interpret them.

morgant said...

hannahl- Macbeth was putting the blame on Banquo. Macbeth was telling the murderers that Banquo was the one who made their lives a living hell. Then he says, are you guys so religious and angelic that you are just going to let this go?? He just wants to convince the murderers that they are killing for a reason. Also, Macbeth says that Banquo was the one who kept you from your riches in life. I hope this helps a little bit.

ParkerH said...

Hannah, its probably some combination of the three. He has power, and was insulting them, and giving them reasons to kill him. So it's probably not just one thing.

morganw said...

Hannah - The only reason I think Macbeth is continuing on his killing spree is because he lacks the will power and strength of character to do what he knows is right.

hannahl said...

Thank you all of you for the clarification. It did help!

Laurenc said...

leslie, what you said about blood leading to more blood is very true. Once you commit one murder then it seems to get easier to commit more. You will also have more ideas on how to kill people. its a little distrubing but true.

in macbeth's case it may go the other way though because Macbeth is not coping with the murders very easily

amyw said...

Macbeth keeps killing people because he just cannot stop. He has become really evil; so evil that he makes his wife look pleasant. Once he started killing, he just couldn't stop because it all just turned into one long chain of paranoia and killing (he was paranoid so he keeps killing people to make sure he'll be able to keep the throne). I guess for him killing is like lying: once you start a lie, it's difficult to stop because you have to keep lying to cover the other lies up. In his case, he must keep killing to secure the throne and because of his own paranoia. Hope this makes sense to all of you who asked this!

amyw said...

I think Macbeth knows what he's doing is wrong because he seems to have incredible guilt over the murders, he just can't stop: blood leads to more blood. He feels guilty and recognizes his wrongdoing, which is actually a sign that he's not totally evil yet. But if he keeps on this path and no one finds him out or tries to stop him, he could become more evil and start feeling less guilty and thinking that what he's doing is right since it will benefit him. Just my thoughts!

josed said...

I'm not disagreeing with anyone who says Macbeth is less of a man, but Lady Macbeth says that because she is trying to taunt him out of the hallucination. Actually, amyw, Macbeth goes all evil I think by the end of Act three, so thats not good. Do you guys think Macbeth will send the murderers out on MacDuff? Why does Macbeth say the magpies made the murder public in Scene 4 After the guests leave? Why would Macbeth trust the witches if they led him to murder?

morgant said...

josed- I'm not sure if this is 100% right, but Macbeth doesn't think that the witches led him to murder. He just thinks that he can get the future out of them. Like, in Act IV, Macbeth will go to see the witches again for more information about the future. They didn't necessarily lead him to that murder. Lady Macbeth certainly did though. Does that help a little bit?

alyssas said...

Amy W.- I totally agree with you about Macbeth knowing that he is doing wrong, but if nobody does anything about it, it will just get worse. He even recognizes it and talks about it throughout the play.

ashleyf said...

Josed, i think Macbeth trusts the witches because even though they led him to commit these terrible crimes, they were still correct on the prochecy. Furthermore, at this point, he is so far into this murdering that the only way out, is the way he got in, the witches.

question: when Macbeth convinces the servents to murder Banquo and told them that Banquo was the cause for all thier misfortune, what gives the servents reason that he is to blame. Did Macbeth give them any legitament reasons as to why Banquo was causing all this for the servents?

josed said...

Ok, thx guys!

amyw said...

josed---I don't think Macbeth will send the murderers to kill Macduff because so far Macduff doesn't seem to have a very big role in this play. He's just a Scottish noble, so what reason would Macbeth have to want him killed?

melissaz said...

maddisonm and alexf, I THINK, if I caught what she was saying right, that she was meaning that the people sha had mentioned that have always kind of had a tainted view of Macbeth, are catching on to the murders and are going to kind-of form an alliance against Macbeth to get him out of power. I hope this helps but I'm not totally sure if this is right but I think so.

maddisonm, that is a great point about how the sons are the one's living and their fathers have died. I never thought of that and it is a very interesting approach.

kristinah, I'm going to try and answer a few of your questions.
Scene1- I think the reason that Macbeth is so conserned about Banquo's where abouts, because, as Ms.Smith said the other day, if he was plotting to kill him, he need to know as much as possiable.
And I don't think Banquo made the lives of the murderer's bad, but he is blaming Banquo for the things that Macbeth himself has done. He needs to have some prop to get the murderer's to go through with the plan and make them feel inferior, by not stoping a man who has caused a lot of problems for them and questioning their manliness.
And yes, Macbeth is definitally learning many "tricks" from his wife to get what he wants. Because it worked for her, why not work for them.
Scene2- I think you are right about the change in their relationship. I wasn't sure before but that was a great point. I think because Macbeth is falling into the track of evil, he is becoming more and more like his wife. Making things less intense. And also, it seems like now Macbeth is taking the reins, so that could also make im more comfortable.
And I had the same connection between Adam and Eve as you did, that was the first thing I though of when I herd that quote.

alyssas, I agree that I don't think that Fleance really has a motive to kill Macbeth. He doesn't know that Macbeth was behind the murder of his father and he doesn't know of the prophesy either. I just don't think he knows enough to have any thought of killing Macbeth.

morganw, I agree that it is hard to picture any witch good. I think she may seem good right know but I think that her intensions are mainly for her purpose, not anyone elses.

hannahl, I think the reason that Macbeth doesn't stop his killing streak is because, he has so stained his heart and has done so much to get to the point he is at, that he just could't stop where he is at to leave all that he is done to fate, he just has turned his heart so much I think he knows that it is to hard to turn back.

amyw, I like your analogy about his killing spree to a lie, that is so true!

ashleyf, That is a great point, I don't think that Macbeth really gave them a strong statement and they were just sucked into it. I think that we could compare the murderers' actions to Macbeth's. Macbeth hasn't really had a very good reason for killng who he has, although it is a better reason then the murderers, but he just gets an idea and runs with it without thinking. The murderers have killed probably many times that I don't hink that they use their instincts. They have cut off the thinking part and as soon as anyone questions their manliness, they are ready to jump on board.

I don't have really any different questions but if I think of 1 I will ask later!

The men in this book are too easily persuaded, it's the woman that seems to have the backbone.

maddieh said...

AshleyF- Yeah I had that question too. I think they were just too eager to blame someone else for all their problems so they didn't really care who was the scapegoat. But I still wonder what was so bad in their lives?

morgant said...

Okay, guys. This will be a long comment. These are some answers to kristinah's questions:

Scene one:
-Banquo has not told Macbeth that he thinks he killed Duncan for the kingship. He did say that quote before Macbeth entered.

-I think that it is a mixture of all of those things. It kind of depends on the context of the sentence.

-Macbeth wants to know where Banquo will be so he can plot his murder accordingly. He wants to make sure Banquo isn't going to someone to say his suspicions. Macbeth doesn't know that Banquo has suspicions, but he needs to be careful.

-That tends to be human nature.

-You are 100% right, but Macbeth's traits are what makes a tragic hero. He tries to control his own fate, and as a result, he ruins his life pretty much.

-Banquo didn't. Macbeth is just trying to persuade the murderers to kill Banquo. Remember, Macbeth also used to be the murderer's enemy. He just wants the murder to actually take place, and he wants the murderers to feel like they are killing for a reason.

scene two:
-I'm sure they were like that before, but when Lady Macbeth suggested to murder Duncan, Macbeth was very unsure. Plus, I think Macbeth knows that Lady Macbeth plays an important role in the murders. (like she fainted at Duncan's murder, and we have yet to find out how she reacts to Banquo's murder)

scene four:
-Macbeth wants to go see the witches again because he needs answers. He wants to know his future. Will he get caught? Will he reign for a really long time? Will he die anytime soon? Those sort of questions he needs answers. Thats why Hecate says that she will boost his confidence. I hope that makes sense.

scene six:
-Macbeth isn't angry at Macduff, but he is suspicious. He keeps sending for him, but Macduff says no. He needs to finish off Macduff to feel secure. Maduff hasn't done anything wrong except that he has suspicions of Macbeth. Macduff is trying to get Macbeth's enemies to go against Macbeth and get him off the throne. That's about Macduff.

I hope those comments answer some of your questions.

chelseas said...

Ashleyf- I think that Macbeth sort of persuaded them to murder Banquo. He was trying to almost have them blame their fears and all misfortunes or bad experiences on Banquo. Banquo was almost the person who was blamed for everything. I hope this helps! Morgant, I agree with your comments. I would have answered the same way. I can’t think of any questions that I have that haven’t been answered already.

ashleyf said...

question: why was Macbeth so eager to make sure that Banquo and Fleance was dead if no one would becoem king until he dies. Then i thought that Fleance might try and kill him to become king, but it doesnt seem that he has those intentions at all.

But i suppose that Mabeth didnt want Banquo areound because he knew of the prophecy, but really, murdering someone because they know a secret of yours? Even though it was the secret that he kille the king.....i jsut dotn know, any thoughts?

kristinah said...

Macbeth didn't want Banquo around because he could produce more heirs to the throne if he didn't kill him along with fleane the only current heir to the throne. It was not only because he was suspicious of macbeth commiting the murder as an act of treason, it was because of the possiblity of the prophesy for banquos sons to become kings to come true. Macbeth is willing, at this point, to do anything to stay king. He feels as if his crown is fruitless and he has killed duncan for banquos sons and he wants to make sure that he can keep his throne that he has now murdered for.

- I am still confused about what Macduff is doing, can anyone clarrify before the quiz, I know ms.smith tried to explain it but I missed some of it. Thanks! I hope my explanation helped a little.

-Also, being a man seems to relate greatly to bravery and fear. If fear is present then that person is not a man.

-Also, I think that the serpent imagery relates to anything that can harm macbeth or his possition. Because he refers to banquo and fleance as serpants because he and his son could take the throne away from him.

kristinah said...

EVERYONE READ THIS IF YOUR CONFUSED ABOUT MACDUFF-
ok I found this in the notes in our book on the opposite page pg 112 Macduff wants the king to persuade the people of Northumberland (an English country near Scottland) and their earl, Siward, to join Malcolm's cause, b/c he has the right to the trone but Macbeth disrupted the order of things when he took it. With their help Malcolm may be able to restore order and peace in Scottland.
This should answer any questions!!!